A Study of the Relationship between Exhibition-related Economic Growth and Environmental Impact

By Shanshan Shen, Robert Vale and Brenda Vale.

Published by The Sustainability Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Recent econometric studies demonstrate that large-scale national and international exhibitions have made direct contributions to real economic growth for local and global communities. However, the negative environmental impacts, generated from the exhibition-related economic stimulus, have generally been ignored. This study aims to analyse the direct and indirect relationships between exhibition-related economic growth and associated environmental impacts in the case of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was the first international exhibition in the world, and one of the most successful. The research explores what the relative environmental impacts of this exhibition were on the national economy, by quantifying and estimating the ecological footprint of exhibition-related industries. The outcome of this study shows that the impact on the environment was increased, together with the growth of the GDP, in the period from 1851 to 1860. Organisers and policy makers need to consider how to develop a more sustainable exposition industry at a time when exhibitions are becoming an increasingly important communication and education platform worldwide.

Keywords: Great Exhibition, Exhibition-related Economic Growth, Ecological Footprint, Sustainable Exhibition

The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp.231-254. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 803.148KB).

Shanshan Shen

PhD Candidate, School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand

Shanshan Shen is a PhD candidate at School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She started her PhD programme in October 2008. Her research is focused on sustainability issues with respect to expositions and exhibition buildings.

Prof. Robert Vale

Professorial Research Fellow, School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand

Robert Vale is a registered architect in the United Kingdom and has a track record of designing low energy and zero energy buildings in both the UK and New Zealand. He has worked as an academic at the Open University and the Universities of Sheffield and Nottingham in the UK, and at the University of Auckland and Victoria University of Wellington in NZ. He has also worked as a Senior Scientist at Landcare Research.

Prof. Brenda Vale

Professorial Research Fellow, School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand

Brenda Vale is a registered architect in the United Kingdom and has a track record of designing low energy and zero energy buildings in both the UK and New Zealand. She has worked as an academic at the Universities of Sheffield and Nottingham in the UK, and at the University of Auckland and Victoria University of Wellington in NZ.

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