Global Public Health, Development, and Sustainability

By Kristine Lykens, Sejong Bae, Sardar Sharif and Karan P. Singh.

Published by The Sustainability Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

As the world continues towards economic interdependency with extensive international travel, migration of workers, and reliance on labor forces worldwide, global public health issues are increasing in significance for both the developing and developed world. Most global health problems are associated with extreme poverty, lack of education, and lack of sanitation and clean water. Thus, in 2000, the United Nations established a set of Millennium Development Goals, to be met by 2015, which address extreme poverty, hunger, primary education, gender equality, child mortality, maternal health, infectious diseases (i.e. HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis), environmental sustainability, and global partnerships for development.

At the midpoint in 2007-2008 for achieving these goals it is important to assess the progress which has been made and the challenges faced so that effective efforts can be reinforced and new approaches developed. At this midpoint extreme poverty and associated hunger decreased from about 1/3 of the world population to 1/5 a trend which will meet the 2015 goals. However, although the extreme poverty rate in Sub-Saharan Africa has declined a few percentage points during this period the rate of decline will fail to meet the goals unless progress is accelerated. Child mortality has declined significantly due to life-saving interventions such as immunizations. This decline is worldwide although the rate of decline is smaller in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia and will likely not meet the 2015 goals. Gross national incme per capita and governmental health expenditures are significantly correlated with child mortality. As discussed above, progress is definitely being made in improving public health worldwide. However, the burden of existing diseases and mortality is not evenly distributed geographically, nor are the rates of improvements. The goals of health, development and sustainability are interdependent. The progress and challenges associated with these goals will be empirically presented.

Keywords: Child Mortality, Health and Development, Global Public Health

The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp.135-146. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.197MB).

Dr. Kristine Lykens

Assistant Professor, Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USA

Kristine Lykens is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health at the University of North Texas Health Science Center. She holds a M.P.A. and Ph.D. in Political Economy from the University of Texas at Dallas. Her research interests include health policy, impact of health policy changes, global public health, children’s health insurance, children’s health programs, health program evaluation, and health care access and quality for disadvantaged populations.

Dr. Sejong Bae

Associate Professor, Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USA

Dr. Bae is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and has over 12 years of experiences in collaborating with investigators from various backgrounds including clinical trials, aging, health outcomes, and multi-center cardiovascular studies. His has published more than 80 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and abstracts in the areas of health outcomes, health disparity, statistical methodology, and other areas of research. His research has been published in numerous academic publications such as the CHEST, American Journal of Health Behavior, JAMA, Health Services Management Research, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentaofacial Orthopedics, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Environmental Modelling and Simulation, Mathematics and computers in Simulation and other places.

Dr. Sardar Sharif

Graduate Student, Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USA

Dr. Karan P. Singh

Professor and Chairman, Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USA

Karan P. Singh, Ph.D, is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Biostatistics, University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC). He has over 16 years of experience in collaborating with the investigators in biomedical research areas. He has broad experience in multidisciplinary research and statistical consulting. He was a tenured professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) before joining the UNTHSC School of Public Health. He has worked as core biostatistician or chief biostatistician at various research centers. He has authored or co-authored over 125 articles and over 150 abstracts. He is an elected member of International Statistical Institute (ISI) and a fellow of the Modeling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand (MSSANZ).

Reviews:

There are currently no reviews of this product.

Write a Review