Cultural Heritage, Tourism, and Site Sustainability at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Chavín de Huántar

By Matthew Sayre, Asunción Cano and Huber Trinidad.

Published by The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability: Annual Review

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: November 24, 2015 $US5.00

This paper analyzes efforts to enhance the sustainability of the UNESCO World Heritage site of Chavín de Huántar, Peru. The site of Chavín de Huántar is a three-thousand-year-old temple located in the Andean Mountains of Peru. In the past this site was known as the Mother Culture of the Andes. Current research conducted by the Stanford Archaeological Project at Chavín has revealed the importance of exchange with outside cultures and the importance of long-term ecological practices of the past inhabitants of Chavín. This paper presents botanical and archaeological data from the site and proposes plans of action for creating a more ecologically sustainable monument. The work has already led to some changes in ecological practice at the site as well as providing recommendations to the governing authorities about how to present the site to the viewing public and local and international tourists. In the future we hope to implement many of these plans and to create a landscape similar to that which existed when the temple was in use.

Keywords: Archaeology, Ecological, Cultural

The International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic, and Social Sustainability: Annual Review, Volume 11, 2015, pp.47-55. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: November 24, 2015 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 654.889KB)).

Dr. Matthew Sayre

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South Dakota, Vermillio, SD, USA

Asunción Cano

Professor, Biological Sciences Faculty and Floristic Laboratory, Dicotyledons Department,, Natural History Museum, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru

Huber Trinidad

Licensed Biologist, Floristic Laboratory, Dicotyledons Department, Natural History Museum, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru